Isaac Newton citations

Isaac Newton foto
4  0

Isaac Newton

Date de naissance: 4. janvier 1643
Date de décès: 20. mars 1727
Autres noms:Sir Isaac Newton

Publicité

Isaac Newton est un philosophe, mathématicien, physicien, alchimiste, astronome et théologien anglais, puis britannique. Figure emblématique des sciences, il est surtout reconnu pour avoir fondé la mécanique classique, pour sa théorie de la gravitation universelle et la création, en concurrence avec Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, du calcul infinitésimal. En optique, il a développé une théorie de la couleur basée sur l'observation selon laquelle un prisme décompose la lumière blanche en un spectre visible. Il a aussi inventé le télescope à réflexion composé d'un miroir primaire concave appelé télescope de Newton.

En mécanique, il a établi les trois lois universelles du mouvement qui constituent en fait des principes à la base de la grande théorie de Newton concernant le mouvement des corps, théorie que l'on nomme aujourd'hui « mécanique newtonienne » ou encore « mécanique classique ».

Il est aussi connu pour la généralisation du théorème du binôme et l'invention dite de la méthode de Newton permettant de trouver des approximations d'un zéro d'une fonction d'une variable réelle à valeurs réelles.

Newton a montré que le mouvement des objets sur Terre et des corps célestes sont gouvernés par les mêmes lois naturelles ; en se basant sur les lois de Kepler sur le mouvement des planètes, il développa la loi universelle de la gravitation.

Son ouvrage Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica,, publié en 1687, est considéré comme une œuvre majeure dans l'histoire de la science. C'est dans celui-ci qu'il décrit la loi universelle de la gravitation, formule les trois lois universelles du mouvement et jette les bases de la mécanique classique. Il a aussi effectué des recherches dans les domaines de la théologie et de l'alchimie.

Citations Isaac Newton

Publicité

„I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.“

— Isaac Newton
Memoirs of the Life, Writings, and Discoveries of Sir Isaac Newton (1855) by Sir David Brewster (Volume II. Ch. 27). Compare: "As children gath'ring pebbles on the shore", John Milton, Paradise Regained, Book iv. Line 330

„Men build too many walls and not enough bridges.“

— Isaac Newton
This became widely attributed to Isaac Newton after Dominique Pire ascribed it to "the words of Newton" in his Nobel Lecture, 11 December 1958.[http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/1958/pire-lecture.html] Pire refers not to Isaac, but to Joseph Fort Newton, who is widely reported to have said "People are lonely because they build walls instead of bridges." This appears to be paraphrased from a longer passage found in his essays and addresses, The One Great Church: Adventures of Faith (1948), pp. 51–52: "Why are so many people shy, lonely, shut up within themselves, unequal to their tasks, unable to be happy? Because they are inhabited by fear, like the man in the Parable of the Talents, erecting walls around themselves instead of building bridges into the lives of others; shutting out life."

„If I have seen further it is by standing on ye sholders of Giants.“

— Isaac Newton, The Correspondence Of Isaac Newton
Context: If I have seen further it is by standing on ye sholders of Giants. <!-- This is DELIBERATELY left in archaic form — for modernized renditions see BELOW Letter to Robert Hooke (15 February 1676) The phrase is most famous as an expression of Newton's but he was using a metaphor which in its earliest known form was attributed to Bernard of Chartres by John of Salisbury: Bernard of Chartres used to say that we [the Moderns] are like dwarves perched on the shoulders of giants [the Ancients], and thus we are able to see more and farther than the latter. And this is not at all because of the acuteness of our sight or the stature of our body, but because we are carried aloft and elevated by the magnitude of the giants.<!-- Metalogicon (1159) bk. 3, ch. 4, as quoted in Medieval Rhetoric : A Casebook (2004) by Scott D. Troyan, p. 10 --> Modernized variants: If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants. If I have seen further it is only by standing on the shoulders of giants.

Publicité

„Useful Things, though Mechanical, are justly preferable to useless Speculations in Geometry“

— Isaac Newton
Context: Useful Things, though Mechanical, are justly preferable to useless Speculations in Geometry, as we learn from Pappus.<!--p.248

„But if I have done the public any service this way, 'tis due to“

— Isaac Newton
Context: When I wrote my treatise about our System, I had an eye upon such principles as might work with considering men for the belief of a Deity and nothing can rejoice me more than to find it useful for that purpose. But if I have done the public any service this way, 'tis due to nothing but industry and a patient thought. Newton to Bentley, 10 December 1692 (first letter), The Correspondence of Isaac Newton, ed. H. W. Turnbull (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1961), 3:233. Referenced on p. 383 of Snobelen SD: "[https://isaacnewtonstheology.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/theology-of-the-principia.pdf The Theology of Isaac Newton’s Principia Mathematica: A Preliminary Survey]," pp. 377–412, Neue Zeitschrift für Systematische Theologie und Religionsphilosophie, Volume 52, Issue 4 (Jan 2010)

„The event will prove the Apocalypse; and this Prophecy, thus proved and understood, will open the old Prophets, and all together will make known the true religion, and establish it. For he that will understand the old Prophets, must begin with this; but the time is not yet come for understanding them perfectly, because the main revolution predicted in them is not yet come to pass.“

— Isaac Newton
Context: The folly of Interpreters has been, to foretell times and things by this Prophecy, as if God designed to make them Prophets. By this rashness they have not only exposed themselves, but brought the Prophecy also into contempt. The design of God was much otherwise. He gave this and the Prophecies of the Old Testament, not to gratify mens curiosities by enabling them to foreknow things, but that after they were fulfilled they might be interpreted by the event, and his own Providence, not the Interpreters, be then manifested thereby to the world. For the event of things predicted many ages before, will then be a convincing argument that the world is governed by providence. For, as the few and obscure Prophecies concerning Christ’s first coming were for setting up the Christian religion, which all nations have since corrupted; so the many and clear Prophecies concerning the things to be done at Christ’s second coming, are not only for predicting but also for effecting a recovery and re-establishment of the long-lost truth, and setting up a kingdom wherein dwells righteousness. The event will prove the Apocalypse; and this Prophecy, thus proved and understood, will open the old Prophets, and all together will make known the true religion, and establish it. For he that will understand the old Prophets, must begin with this; but the time is not yet come for understanding them perfectly, because the main revolution predicted in them is not yet come to pass. In the days of the voice of the seventh Angel, when he shall begin to sound, the mystery of God shall be finished, as he hath declared to his servants the Prophets: and then the kingdoms of this world shall become the kingdom of our Lord and his Christ, and he shall reign for ever, Apoc. x. 7. xi. 15. There is already so much of the Prophecy fulfilled, that as many as will take pains in this study, may see sufficient instances of God’s providence: but then the signal revolutions predicted by all the holy Prophets, will at once both turn men’s eyes upon considering the predictions, and plainly interpret them. Till then we must content ourselves with interpreting what hath been already fulfilled. Amongst the Interpreters of the last age there to scarce one of note who hath not made some discovery worth knowing; and thence I seem to gather that God is about opening these mysteries. The success of others put me upon considering it; and if I have done any thing which may be useful to following writers, I have my design. Vol. II, Ch. 1 : Introduction, concerning the time when the Apocalypse was written

„Fidelity & Allegiance sworn to the King is only such a fidelity and obedience as is due to him by the law of the land; for were that faith and allegiance more than what the law requires, we would swear ourselves slaves“

— Isaac Newton
Context: 1. Fidelity & Allegiance sworn to the King is only such a fidelity and obedience as is due to him by the law of the land; for were that faith and allegiance more than what the law requires, we would swear ourselves slaves, and the King absolute; whereas, by the law, we are free men, notwithstanding those Oaths. 2. When, therefore, the obligation by the law to fidelity and allegiance ceases, that by the Oath also ceases... Letter to Dr. Covel Feb. 21, (1688-9) Thirteen Letters from Sir Isaac Newton to J. Covel, D.D. (1848)

Publicité

„What is there in places empty of matter? and Whence is it that the sun and planets gravitate toward one another without dense matter between them? Whence is it that Nature doth nothing in vain?“

— Isaac Newton
Context: What is there in places empty of matter? and Whence is it that the sun and planets gravitate toward one another without dense matter between them? Whence is it that Nature doth nothing in vain? and Whence arises all that order and beauty which we see in the world? To what end are comets? and Whence is it that planets move all one and the same way in orbs concentrick, while comets move all manner of ways in orbs very excentrick? and What hinders the fixed stars from falling upon one another? Query 28 : Are not all Hypotheses erroneous in which Light is supposed to consist of Pression or Motion propagated through a fluid medium?

„We account the Scriptures of God to be the most sublime philosophy. I find more sure remarks of authenticity in the Bible than in any profane history whatever“

— Isaac Newton
Context: We account the Scriptures of God to be the most sublime philosophy. I find more sure remarks of authenticity in the Bible than in any profane history whatever. Anecdote reported by Dr. Robert Smith, late Master of Trinity College, to his student Richard Watson, as something that Newton expressed when he was writing his Commentary On Daniel. In Watson's Apology for the Bible. London 8vo. (1806), p. 57

„All these superstitions the Apostle refers to“

— Isaac Newton
Context: The Cataphrygians brought in also several other superstitions: such as were the doctrine of Ghosts, and of their punishment in Purgatory, with prayers and oblations for mitigating that punishment, as Tertullian teaches in his books De Anima and De Monogamia. They used also the sign of the cross as a charm. So Tertullian in his book de Corona militis... All these superstitions the Apostle refers to, where he saith: Now the Spirit speaketh expressly, that in the latter times some shall depart from the faith, giving heed to seducing spirits, and doctrines of devils, the Dæmons and Ghosts worshiped by the heathens, speaking lies in hypocrisy, about their apparitions, the miracles done by them, their relics, and the sign of the cross, having consciences seared with a hot iron; forbidding to marry, and commanding to abstain from meats, &c. 1 Tim. iv. 1,2,3. From the Cataphrygians these principles and practices were propagated down to posterity. For the mystery of iniquity did already work in the Apostles days in the Gnostics, continued to work very strongly in their offspring the Tatianists and Cataphrygians, and was to work till that man of sin should be revealed; whose coming is after the working of Satan, with all power and signs, and lying wonders, and all deceivableness of unrighteousness; colored over with a form of Christian godliness, but without the power thereof, 2 Thess. ii. 7-10. Vol. I, Ch. 13: Of the King who did according to his will, and magnified himself above every God, and honored Mahuzzims, and regarded not the desire of women

„Thus have we in the Gospels of Matthew and John all things told in due order, from the beginning of John's preaching to the death of Christ, and the years distinguished from one another by such essential characters that they cannot be mistaken.“

— Isaac Newton
Context: Thus have we in the Gospels of Matthew and John all things told in due order, from the beginning of John's preaching to the death of Christ, and the years distinguished from one another by such essential characters that they cannot be mistaken. The second Passover is distinguished from the first, by the interposition of John's imprisonment. The third is distinguished from the second, by a double character: first, by the interposition of the feast to which Christ went up, Mat. viii. 19. Luke ix. 57. and secondly, by the distance of time from the beginning of Christ's preaching: for the second was in the beginning of his preaching, and the third so long after, that before it came Christ said, from the days of John the Baptist until now, &c. and upbraided the cities of Galilee for their not repenting at his preaching, and mighty works done in all that time. The fourth is distinguished from the third, by the mission of the twelve from Christ to preach in the cities of Judea in all the interval. The fifth is distinguished from all the former by the twelve's being returned from preaching, and continuing with Christ during all the interval, between the fourth and fifth, and by the passion and other infallible characters. Vol. I, Ch. 11: Of the Times of the Birth and Passion of Christ

Prochain
Anniversaires aujourd'hui
Philip Warren Anderson foto
Philip Warren Anderson
physicien américain 1923
Mary Francis Butts
écrivaine britannique 1890 - 1937
Richard Holbrooke foto
Richard Holbrooke
diplomate américain 1941 - 2010
Frances Wright foto
Frances Wright
1795 - 1852
Un autre 94 ans aujourd'hui
Auteurs similaires
Nicole Oresme foto
Nicole Oresme
prélat catholique
Jacques Babinet foto
Jacques Babinet
physicien et astronome français
James Jeans foto
James Jeans
physicien, astronome et mathématicien britannique
Pierre Gassendi foto
Pierre Gassendi
philosophe, astronome, mathématicien, physicien, théologien…
Samuel Vince foto
Samuel Vince
Mathématicien, astronome et physicien anglais
Willem de Sitter foto
Willem de Sitter
astronome hollandais
 Al-Biruni foto
Al-Biruni
universitaire, astronome et mathématicien perse
Jean-Baptiste Biot foto
Jean-Baptiste Biot
physicien, astronome et mathématicien français