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Francis Bacon

Date de naissance: 22. janvier 1561
Date de décès: 9. avril 1626
Autres noms:Sir Francis Bacon

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Francis Bacon, né le 22 janvier 1561 à Londres et mort à Highgate près de la même ville en 1626, baron de Verulam, vicomte de St Albans, Chancelier d’Angleterre, est un scientifique et philosophe anglais. Francis Bacon développe dans son œuvre le De dignitate et augmentis scientiarum une théorie empiriste de la connaissance, et il précise les règles de la méthode expérimentale dans le Novum Organum, ce qui fait de lui l’un des pionniers de la pensée scientifique moderne.

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Citations Francis Bacon

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„The use of this feigned history hath been to give some shadow of satisfaction to the mind of man in those points wherein the nature of things doth deny it, the world being in proportion inferior to the soul“

— Francis Bacon
Context: The use of this feigned history hath been to give some shadow of satisfaction to the mind of man in those points wherein the nature of things doth deny it, the world being in proportion inferior to the soul; by reason whereof there is, agreeable to the spirit of man, a more ample greatness, a more exact goodness, and a more absolute variety, than can be found in the nature of things. Therefore, because the acts or events of true history have not that magnitude which satisfieth the mind of man, poesy feigneth acts and events greater and more heroical: because true history propoundeth the successes and issues of actions not so agreeable to the merits of virtue and vice, therefore poesy feigns them more just in retribution, and more according to revealed providence: because true history representeth actions and events more ordinary, and less interchanged, therefore poesy endueth them with more rareness, and more unexpected and alternative variations: so as it appeareth that poesy serveth and conferreth to magnanimity, morality, and to delectation. And therefore it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because it doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting the shows of things to the desires of the mind; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind into the nature of things. Book II, iv, 2

„Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested“

— Francis Bacon
Context: Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested: that is, some books are to be read only in parts, others to be read, but not curiously, and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. Of Studies

„If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties.“

— Francis Bacon, The Advancement Of Learning
Context: The two ways of contemplation are not unlike the two ways of action commonly spoken of by the ancients: the one plain and smooth in the beginning, and in the end impassable; the other rough and troublesome in the entrance, but after a while fair and even. So it is in contemplation: If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Book I, v, 8

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„There are four classes of Idols which beset men's minds.“

— Francis Bacon
Context: There are four classes of Idols which beset men's minds. To these for distinction's sake I have assigned names — calling the first class, Idols of the Tribe; the second, Idols of the Cave; the third, Idols of the Market-Place; the fourth, Idols of the Theater. Aphorism 39

„The other derives axioms from the senses and particulars, rising by a gradual and unbroken ascent, so that it arrives at the most general axioms last of all. This is the true way, but as yet untried.“

— Francis Bacon
Context: There are and can be only two ways of searching into and discovering truth. The one flies from the senses and particulars to the most general axioms, and from these principles, the truth of which it takes for settled and immovable, proceeds to judgment and to the discovery of middle axioms. And this way is now in fashion. The other derives axioms from the senses and particulars, rising by a gradual and unbroken ascent, so that it arrives at the most general axioms last of all. This is the true way, but as yet untried. Aphorism 19

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