Francis Bacon citations

Francis Bacon foto
8  0

Francis Bacon

Date de naissance: 22. janvier 1561
Date de décès: 9. avril 1626
Autres noms:Sir Francis Bacon

Publicité

Francis Bacon, né le 22 janvier 1561 à Londres et mort à Highgate près de la même ville en 1626, baron de Verulam, vicomte de St Albans, Chancelier d’Angleterre, est un scientifique et philosophe anglais. Francis Bacon développe dans son œuvre le De dignitate et augmentis scientiarum une théorie empiriste de la connaissance, et il précise les règles de la méthode expérimentale dans le Novum Organum, ce qui fait de lui l’un des pionniers de la pensée scientifique moderne.

Auteurs similaires

Bryan Magee
personnalité politique britannique
Anthony Ashley-Cooper foto
Anthony Ashley-Cooper
Philosophe anglais
Edward Hyde foto
Edward Hyde
personnalité politique britannique
David Hartley foto
David Hartley
philosophe britannique
John Locke foto
John Locke3
philosophe britannique
Joseph Addison foto
Joseph Addison
Écrivain, poète et homme d’État anglais
William Cecil foto
William Cecil
politicien britannique

Citations Francis Bacon

Publicité
Publicité

„Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested“

— Francis Bacon
Context: Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested: that is, some books are to be read only in parts, others to be read, but not curiously, and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. Of Studies

„If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties.“

— Francis Bacon, The Advancement Of Learning
Context: The two ways of contemplation are not unlike the two ways of action commonly spoken of by the ancients: the one plain and smooth in the beginning, and in the end impassable; the other rough and troublesome in the entrance, but after a while fair and even. So it is in contemplation: If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Book I, v, 8

Publicité

„It cannot be that axioms established by argumentation should avail for the discovery of new works, since the subtlety of nature is greater many times over than the subtlety of argument.“

— Francis Bacon
Context: It cannot be that axioms established by argumentation should avail for the discovery of new works, since the subtlety of nature is greater many times over than the subtlety of argument. But axioms duly and orderly formed from particulars easily discover the way to new particulars, and thus render sciences active. Aphorism 24

„Let men learn (as we have said above) the difference that exists between the idols of the human mind, and the ideas of the Divine mind. The former are mere arbitrary abstractions; the latter the true marks of the Creator on his creatures, as they are imprinted on, and defined in matter, by true and exquisite touches.“

— Francis Bacon
Context: Let men learn (as we have said above) the difference that exists between the idols of the human mind, and the ideas of the Divine mind. The former are mere arbitrary abstractions; the latter the true marks of the Creator on his creatures, as they are imprinted on, and defined in matter, by true and exquisite touches. Truth, therefore, and utility are here perfectly identical. Aphorism 124

„Further, it will not be amiss to distinguish the three kinds and, as it were, grades of ambition in mankind.“

— Francis Bacon
Context: Further, it will not be amiss to distinguish the three kinds and, as it were, grades of ambition in mankind. The first is of those who desire to extend their own power in their native country, a vulgar and degenerate kind. The second is of those who labor to extend the power and dominion of their country among men. This certainly has more dignity, though not less covetousness. But if a man endeavor to establish and extend the power and dominion of the human race itself over the universe, his ambition (if ambition it can be called) is without doubt both a more wholesome and a more noble thing than the other two. Now the empire of man over things depends wholly on the arts and sciences. For we cannot command nature except by obeying her. Aphorism 129

Prochain
Anniversaires aujourd'hui
William L. Shirer foto
William L. Shirer
journaliste américain 1904 - 1993
Bernard Cornwell foto
Bernard Cornwell
écrivain britannique 1944
Jean Lartéguy
écrivain et journaliste français 1920 - 2011
Frederick Busch
écrivain américain 1941 - 2006
Un autre 59 ans aujourd'hui
Auteurs similaires
Bryan Magee
personnalité politique britannique
Anthony Ashley-Cooper foto
Anthony Ashley-Cooper
Philosophe anglais
Edward Hyde foto
Edward Hyde
personnalité politique britannique