W.B. Yeats citations

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W.B. Yeats

Date de naissance: 13. juin 1865
Date de décès: 28. janvier 1939

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William Butler Yeats , est un poète et dramaturge irlandais, né le 13 juin 1865 à Sandymount et mort le 28 janvier 1939 à Roquebrune Cap Martin,, en France. Fils du peintre John Butler Yeats, il est l'un des instigateurs du renouveau de la littérature irlandaise et cofondateur, avec Lady Gregory, de l'Abbey Theatre. Il a reçu le prix Nobel de littérature en 1923.

Ses premières œuvres aspiraient à une richesse romantique, ce que retrace son recueil publié en 1893 Crépuscule celtique, mais la quarantaine venant, inspiré par sa relation avec les poètes modernistes comme Ezra Pound et en lien avec son implication dans le nationalisme irlandais, il évolua vers un style moderne sans concession. Yeats fut aussi un sénateur de l'État libre d'Irlande pendant deux mandats.

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Citations W.B. Yeats

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„But I, being poor, have only my dreams;
I have spread my dreams beneath your feet;
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.“

—  W.B. Yeats, The Wind Among the Reeds
Context: Had I the heavens' embroidered cloths, Enwrought with the golden and silver light, The blue and the dim and the dark cloths Of night and light and half-light, I would spread the cloths under your feet: But I, being poor, have only my dreams; I have spread my dreams beneath your feet; Tread softly because you tread on my dreams. He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1499/

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„Heaven blazing into the head:
Tragedy wrought to its uttermost.“

—  W.B. Yeats
Context: Heaven blazing into the head: Tragedy wrought to its uttermost. Though Hamlet rambles and Lear rages, And all the drop-scenes drop at once Upon a hundred thousand stages, It cannot grow by an inch or an ounce. Lapis Lazuli, st. 2

„The unavailing outcries and the old bitterness
That empty the heart.“

—  W.B. Yeats
Context: I have heard the pigeons of the Seven Woods Make their faint thunder, and the garden bees Hum in the lime-tree flowers; and put away The unavailing outcries and the old bitterness That empty the heart. I have forgot awhile Tara uprooted, and new commonness Upon the throne and crying about the streets And hanging its paper flowers from post to post, Because it is alone of all things happy. I am contented, for I know that Quiet Wanders laughing and eating her wild heart Among pigeons and bees, while that Great Archer, Who but awaits His house to shoot, still hands A cloudy quiver over Pairc-na-lee. In The Seven Woods http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1518/

„Song, let them take it,
For there’s more enterprise
In walking naked.“

—  W.B. Yeats
Context: I made my song a coat Covered with embroideries Out of old mythologies From heel to throat; But the fools caught it, Wore it in the world’s eyes As though they’d wrought it. Song, let them take it, For there’s more enterprise In walking naked. A Coat http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1393/

„Some may have blamed you that you took away
The verses that could move them on the day“

—  W.B. Yeats
Context: Some may have blamed you that you took away The verses that could move them on the day When, the ears being deafened, the sight of the eyes blind With lightning, you went from me, and I could find Nothing to make a song about but kings, Helmets, and swords, and half-forgotten things That were like memories of you--but now We'll out, for the world lives as long ago; And while we're in our laughing, weeping fit, Hurl helmets, crowns, and swords into the pit. But, dear, cling close to me; since you were gone, My barren thoughts have chilled me to the bone. Reconciliation http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1568/

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„The finished man among his enemies?—
How in the name of Heaven can he escape
That defiling and disfigured shape
The mirror of malicious eyes
Casts upon his eyes until at last
He thinks that shape must be his shape?“

—  W.B. Yeats
Context: What matter if I live it all once more? Endure that toil of growing up; The ignominy of boyhood; the distress Of boyhood changing into man; The unfinished man and his pain Brought face to face with his own clumsiness; The finished man among his enemies?— How in the name of Heaven can he escape That defiling and disfigured shape The mirror of malicious eyes Casts upon his eyes until at last He thinks that shape must be his shape? II, st. 1

„With lightning, you went from me, and I could find
Nothing to make a song about“

—  W.B. Yeats
Context: Some may have blamed you that you took away The verses that could move them on the day When, the ears being deafened, the sight of the eyes blind With lightning, you went from me, and I could find Nothing to make a song about but kings, Helmets, and swords, and half-forgotten things That were like memories of you--but now We'll out, for the world lives as long ago; And while we're in our laughing, weeping fit, Hurl helmets, crowns, and swords into the pit. But, dear, cling close to me; since you were gone, My barren thoughts have chilled me to the bone. Reconciliation http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1568/

„The Land of Faery,
Where nobody gets old and godly and grave“

—  W.B. Yeats
Context: The Land of Faery, Where nobody gets old and godly and grave, Where nobody gets old and crafty and wise, Where nobody gets old and bitter of tongue. Lines 48–52

„Crying amid the glittering sea,
Naming it with the ecstatic breath,
Because it had such dignity,
By the sweet name of Death.“

—  W.B. Yeats
Context: I swayed upon the gaudy stern The butt-end of a steering-oar, And saw wherever I could turn A crowd upon a shore. And though I would have hushed the crowd, There was no mother's son but said, 'What is the figure in a shroud Upon a gaudy bed?' And after running at the brim Cried out upon that thing beneath --It had such dignity of a limb-- By the sweet name of Death. Though I'd my finger on my lip, What could I but take up the song? And running crowd and gaudy ship Cried out the whole night long, Crying amid the glittering sea, Naming it with the ecstatic breath, Because it had such dignity, By the sweet name of Death. His Dream http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/1509/

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