Herbert George Wells citations

Herbert George Wells photo
6   0

Herbert George Wells

Date de naissance: 21. septembre 1866
Date de décès: 13. août 1946
Autres noms:H.G. Wells, Герберт Уэллс

Publicité

Herbert George Wells, plus connu sous la signature H. G. Wells, né le 21 septembre 1866 à Bromley dans le Kent et mort le 13 août 1946 à Londres, est un écrivain britannique surtout connu aujourd'hui pour ses romans de science-fiction. Il fut cependant également l'auteur de nombreux romans de satire sociale, d'œuvres de prospective, de réflexions politiques et sociales ainsi que d'ouvrages de vulgarisation touchant aussi bien à la biologie, à l'histoire qu'aux questions sociales. Il est considéré comme le père de la science-fiction contemporaine.

Auteurs similaires

David Icke photo
David Icke8
écrivain britannique
Roald Dahl photo
Roald Dahl1
écrivain gallois
Horatio Nelson photo
Horatio Nelson7
officier britannique
Alan Turing photo
Alan Turing4
mathématicien britannique
Maxence Fermine photo
Maxence Fermine7
écrivain français
Brian May photo
Brian May1
guitariste, pianiste de rock et astrophysicien britannique
Chinua Achebe photo
Chinua Achebe2
Écrivain nigérian
Andrew Coburn photo
Andrew Coburn44
écrivain américain
Jacques Cazotte photo
Jacques Cazotte6
écrivain français

Citations Herbert George Wells

Publicité

„Money and credit are as much human contrivances as bicycles, and as liable to expansion and modification as any other sort of prevalent but imperfect machine.“

—  H. G. Wells
Context: Money and credit are as much human contrivances as bicycles, and as liable to expansion and modification as any other sort of prevalent but imperfect machine. And how will the new republic treat the inferior races? How will it deal with the black? how will it deal with the yellow man? how will it tackle that alleged termite in the civilized woodwork, the Jew? Certainly not as races at all. It will aim to establish, and it will at last, though probably only after a second century has passed, establish a world state with a common language and a common rule. All over the world its roads, its standards, its laws, and its apparatus of control will run. It will, I have said, make the multiplication of those who fall behind a certain standard of social efficiency unpleasant and difficult… The Jew will probably lose much of his particularism, intermarry with Gentiles, and cease to be a physically distinct element in human affairs in a century or so. But much of his moral tradition will, I hope, never die. … And for the rest, those swarms of black, and brown, and dirty-white, and yellow people, who do not come into the new needs of efficiency? Well, the world is a world, not a charitable institution, and I take it they will have to go. The whole tenor and meaning of the world, as I see it, is that they have to go. So far as they fail to develop sane, vigorous, and distinctive personalities for the great world of the future, it is their portion to die out and disappear. The world has a greater purpose than happiness; our lives are to serve God's purpose, and that purpose aims not at man as an end, but works through him to greater issues. Anticipations of the Reaction of Mechanical and Scientific Progress Upon Human Life and Thought http://books.google.com/books?id=OTP8dQHO57UC (1901), The Faith, Morals, and Public Policy of The New Republic, pp. 340–343

„Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe...“

—  H. G. Wells
Context: Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe... Yet, clumsily or smoothly, the world, it seems, progresses and will progress. Ch. 41

Publicité

„We do not want dictators, we do not want oligarchic parties or class rule, we want a widespread world intelligence conscious of itself.“

—  H. G. Wells
Context: We do not want dictators, we do not want oligarchic parties or class rule, we want a widespread world intelligence conscious of itself. To work out a way to that world brain organization is therefore our primary need in this age of imperative construction. Preface, p. xvi

„And how will the new republic treat the inferior races?“

—  H. G. Wells
Context: Money and credit are as much human contrivances as bicycles, and as liable to expansion and modification as any other sort of prevalent but imperfect machine. And how will the new republic treat the inferior races? How will it deal with the black? how will it deal with the yellow man? how will it tackle that alleged termite in the civilized woodwork, the Jew? Certainly not as races at all. It will aim to establish, and it will at last, though probably only after a second century has passed, establish a world state with a common language and a common rule. All over the world its roads, its standards, its laws, and its apparatus of control will run. It will, I have said, make the multiplication of those who fall behind a certain standard of social efficiency unpleasant and difficult… The Jew will probably lose much of his particularism, intermarry with Gentiles, and cease to be a physically distinct element in human affairs in a century or so. But much of his moral tradition will, I hope, never die. … And for the rest, those swarms of black, and brown, and dirty-white, and yellow people, who do not come into the new needs of efficiency? Well, the world is a world, not a charitable institution, and I take it they will have to go. The whole tenor and meaning of the world, as I see it, is that they have to go. So far as they fail to develop sane, vigorous, and distinctive personalities for the great world of the future, it is their portion to die out and disappear. The world has a greater purpose than happiness; our lives are to serve God's purpose, and that purpose aims not at man as an end, but works through him to greater issues. Anticipations of the Reaction of Mechanical and Scientific Progress Upon Human Life and Thought http://books.google.com/books?id=OTP8dQHO57UC (1901), The Faith, Morals, and Public Policy of The New Republic, pp. 340–343

„If we don’t end war, war will end us.“

—  H. G. Wells
Context: John Cabal: If we don’t end war, war will end us.

„Yet, across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us.“

—  H. G. Wells
Context: No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water. With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their assurance of their empire over matter. It is possible that the infusoria under the microscope do the same... Yet, across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us. Book I, Ch. 1: The Eve of the War

Publicité

„Nothing could have been more obvious to the people of the early twentieth century than the rapidity with which war was becoming impossible. And as certainly they did not see it.“

—  H. G. Wells
Context: Nothing could have been more obvious to the people of the early twentieth century than the rapidity with which war was becoming impossible. And as certainly they did not see it. They did not see it until the atomic bombs burst in their fumbling hands. The World Set Free (1914)

„There is, though I do not know how there is or why there is, a sense of infinite peace and protection in the glittering hosts of heaven.“

—  H. G. Wells
Context: There is, though I do not know how there is or why there is, a sense of infinite peace and protection in the glittering hosts of heaven. There it must be, I think, in the vast and eternal laws of matter, and not in the daily cares and sins and troubles of men, that whatever is more than animal within us must find its solace and its hope. Ch. 22: The Man Alone

„Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo.“

—  H. G. Wells
Context: Moral indignation is jealousy with a halo. It is the peculiar snare of the perplexed orthodox, and soon Mr. Brumley was in a state of nearly unendurable moral indignation with Sir Isaac for a hundred exaggerations of what he was and of what conceivably he might have done to his silent yet manifestly unsuitably married wife. The Wife of Sir Isaac Harman (1914), p. 299

„More lives were wasted by the British generals alone on the opening day of what is known as the Somme offensive of July, 1916 than in the whole French Revolution from start to finish.“

—  H. G. Wells
Context: From 1789 to late in 1791 the French Revolution was an orderly process, and from the summer of 1794 the Republic was an orderly and victorious state. The Terror was not the work of the whole country, but of the town mob which owed its existence and its savagery to the misrule, and social injustice of the ancient regime... More lives were wasted by the British generals alone on the opening day of what is known as the Somme offensive of July, 1916 than in the whole French Revolution from start to finish. Ch. 36

Help us translate English quotes

Discover interesting quotes and translate them.

Translate quotes
Prochain
Anniversaires aujourd'hui
Ernest Hemingway photo
Ernest Hemingway18
écrivain, journaliste et correspondant de guerre américain 1899 - 1961
Annie Leclerc4
1940 - 2006
David Ogilvy photo
David Ogilvy5
1911 - 1999
Theodore Bikel photo
Theodore Bikel
acteur américain 1924 - 2015
Un autre 55 ans aujourd'hui
Auteurs similaires
David Icke photo
David Icke8
écrivain britannique
Roald Dahl photo
Roald Dahl1
écrivain gallois
Horatio Nelson photo
Horatio Nelson7
officier britannique
Alan Turing photo
Alan Turing4
mathématicien britannique