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Érasme

Date de naissance: 28. octobre 1466
Date de décès: 12. juillet 1536
Autres noms:Gerrit Gerritszoon,Erazmus Rotterdamský

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Érasme, également appelé Érasme de Rotterdam , né dans la nuit du 27 au 28 octobre, en 1467 à Rotterdam, comté de Hollande, et mort le 12 juillet 1536 à Bâle, est un chanoine régulier de saint Augustin, philosophe, écrivain latin, humaniste et théologien des Pays-Bas bourguignons, considéré comme l’une des figures majeures de la culture européenne.

Il reste essentiellement connu aujourd'hui pour sa declamatio satirique Éloge de la folie , et dans une moindre mesure pour Adages , anthologie de plus de quatre mille citations grecques et latines, et pour Colloques , recueil d'essais didactiques aux thèmes variés, bien que son œuvre, bien plus vaste et complexe, comprenne des essais et des traités sur un très grand nombre de sujets, sur les problèmes de son temps comme sur l'Art, l'éducation, la religion, la guerre, ou la philosophie, éclectisme propre aux préoccupations d'un auteur humaniste.

Citations Érasme

„But there is craft, and plenty of it — craft enough to impose on mature men, not to say innocent boys; and this is called profession.“

— Desiderius Erasmus
Context: There are monasteries where there is no discipline, and which are worse than brothels — ut prae his lupanaria sint et magis sobria et magis pudica. There are others where religion is nothing but ritual; and these are worse than the first, for the Spirit of God is not in them, and they are inflated with self-righteousness. There are those, again, where the brethren are so sick of the imposture that they keep it up only to deceive the vulgar. The houses are rare indeed where the rule is seriously observed, and even in these few, if you look to the bottom, you will find small sincerity. But there is craft, and plenty of it — craft enough to impose on mature men, not to say innocent boys; and this is called profession. Suppose a house where all is as it ought to be, you have no security that it will continue so. A good superior may be followed by a fool or a tyrant, or an infected brother may introduce a moral plague. True, in extreme cases a monk may change his house, or even may change his order, but leave is rarely given. There is always a suspicion of something wrong, and on the least complaint such a person is sent back. Letter to Lambertus Grunnius (August 1516), publised in [http://books.google.com/books?id=ussXAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA180&lpg=PA180&dq=%22is+no+discipline+and+which+are+worse+than+brothels%22&source=bl&ots=PnJjrkSLNB&sig=JPY0PhTf2YgYwJlf3uH2eTvCJeA&hl=en&ei=BGwXTNqTA5XANu6_pJ8L&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBIQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22is%20no%20discipline%20and%20which%20are%20worse%20than%20brothels%22&f=false Life and Letters of Erasmus : Lectures delivered at Oxford 1893-4 (1894)] edited by James Anthony Froude, p. 180

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„There is always a suspicion of something wrong, and on the least complaint such a person is sent back.“

— Desiderius Erasmus
Context: There are monasteries where there is no discipline, and which are worse than brothels — ut prae his lupanaria sint et magis sobria et magis pudica. There are others where religion is nothing but ritual; and these are worse than the first, for the Spirit of God is not in them, and they are inflated with self-righteousness. There are those, again, where the brethren are so sick of the imposture that they keep it up only to deceive the vulgar. The houses are rare indeed where the rule is seriously observed, and even in these few, if you look to the bottom, you will find small sincerity. But there is craft, and plenty of it — craft enough to impose on mature men, not to say innocent boys; and this is called profession. Suppose a house where all is as it ought to be, you have no security that it will continue so. A good superior may be followed by a fool or a tyrant, or an infected brother may introduce a moral plague. True, in extreme cases a monk may change his house, or even may change his order, but leave is rarely given. There is always a suspicion of something wrong, and on the least complaint such a person is sent back. Letter to Lambertus Grunnius (August 1516), publised in [http://books.google.com/books?id=ussXAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA180&lpg=PA180&dq=%22is+no+discipline+and+which+are+worse+than+brothels%22&source=bl&ots=PnJjrkSLNB&sig=JPY0PhTf2YgYwJlf3uH2eTvCJeA&hl=en&ei=BGwXTNqTA5XANu6_pJ8L&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBIQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22is%20no%20discipline%20and%20which%20are%20worse%20than%20brothels%22&f=false Life and Letters of Erasmus : Lectures delivered at Oxford 1893-4 (1894)] edited by James Anthony Froude, p. 180

„I doubt if a single individual could be found from the whole of mankind free from some form of insanity. The only difference is one of degree.“

— Desiderius Erasmus
Context: I doubt if a single individual could be found from the whole of mankind free from some form of insanity. The only difference is one of degree. A man who sees a gourd and takes it for his wife is called insane because this happens to very few people. As quoted in Words from the Wise : Over 6,000 of the Smartest Things Ever Said (2007) by Rosemarie Jarski, p. 312

„There are others where religion is nothing but ritual; and these are worse than the first, for the Spirit of God is not in them, and they are inflated with self-righteousness.“

— Desiderius Erasmus
Context: There are monasteries where there is no discipline, and which are worse than brothels — ut prae his lupanaria sint et magis sobria et magis pudica. There are others where religion is nothing but ritual; and these are worse than the first, for the Spirit of God is not in them, and they are inflated with self-righteousness. There are those, again, where the brethren are so sick of the imposture that they keep it up only to deceive the vulgar. The houses are rare indeed where the rule is seriously observed, and even in these few, if you look to the bottom, you will find small sincerity. But there is craft, and plenty of it — craft enough to impose on mature men, not to say innocent boys; and this is called profession. Suppose a house where all is as it ought to be, you have no security that it will continue so. A good superior may be followed by a fool or a tyrant, or an infected brother may introduce a moral plague. True, in extreme cases a monk may change his house, or even may change his order, but leave is rarely given. There is always a suspicion of something wrong, and on the least complaint such a person is sent back. Letter to Lambertus Grunnius (August 1516), publised in [http://books.google.com/books?id=ussXAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA180&lpg=PA180&dq=%22is+no+discipline+and+which+are+worse+than+brothels%22&source=bl&ots=PnJjrkSLNB&sig=JPY0PhTf2YgYwJlf3uH2eTvCJeA&hl=en&ei=BGwXTNqTA5XANu6_pJ8L&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBIQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22is%20no%20discipline%20and%20which%20are%20worse%20than%20brothels%22&f=false Life and Letters of Erasmus : Lectures delivered at Oxford 1893-4 (1894)] edited by James Anthony Froude, p. 180

„If there is truth in the popular legend, that Antichrist will be born from a monk and a nun (which is the story these people keep putting about), how many thousands of Antichrists the world must have already!“

— Desiderius Erasmus
Context: There is no doubt about Martin Luther's marriage, but the rumour about his wife's early confinement is false; she is said however to be pregnant now. If there is truth in the popular legend, that Antichrist will be born from a monk and a nun (which is the story these people keep putting about), how many thousands of Antichrists the world must have already! Responding to rumours prompted by the marriage of Martin Luther, in a letter to François Dubois (13 March 1526), as translated in The Correspondence of Erasmus : Letters 1658 to 1801, January 1526-March 1527 (1974) edited by Charles Garfield Nauert and Alexander Dalzell, p. 79 Paraphrased variant: They say that the Antichrist will be born of a monk and a nun. If so, there must already be thousands of Antichrists.

„There are monasteries where there is no discipline, and which are worse than brothels“

— Desiderius Erasmus
Context: There are monasteries where there is no discipline, and which are worse than brothels — ut prae his lupanaria sint et magis sobria et magis pudica. There are others where religion is nothing but ritual; and these are worse than the first, for the Spirit of God is not in them, and they are inflated with self-righteousness. There are those, again, where the brethren are so sick of the imposture that they keep it up only to deceive the vulgar. The houses are rare indeed where the rule is seriously observed, and even in these few, if you look to the bottom, you will find small sincerity. But there is craft, and plenty of it — craft enough to impose on mature men, not to say innocent boys; and this is called profession. Suppose a house where all is as it ought to be, you have no security that it will continue so. A good superior may be followed by a fool or a tyrant, or an infected brother may introduce a moral plague. True, in extreme cases a monk may change his house, or even may change his order, but leave is rarely given. There is always a suspicion of something wrong, and on the least complaint such a person is sent back. Letter to Lambertus Grunnius (August 1516), publised in [http://books.google.com/books?id=ussXAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA180&lpg=PA180&dq=%22is+no+discipline+and+which+are+worse+than+brothels%22&source=bl&ots=PnJjrkSLNB&sig=JPY0PhTf2YgYwJlf3uH2eTvCJeA&hl=en&ei=BGwXTNqTA5XANu6_pJ8L&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBIQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22is%20no%20discipline%20and%20which%20are%20worse%20than%20brothels%22&f=false Life and Letters of Erasmus : Lectures delivered at Oxford 1893-4 (1894)] edited by James Anthony Froude, p. 180

„I have no patience with those who say that sexual excitement is shameful and that venereal stimuli have their origin not in nature, but in sin. Nothing is so far from the truth.“

— Desiderius Erasmus
Context: I have no patience with those who say that sexual excitement is shameful and that venereal stimuli have their origin not in nature, but in sin. Nothing is so far from the truth. As if marriage, whose function cannot be fulfilled without these incitements, did not rise above blame. In other living creatures, where do these incitements come from? From nature or from sin? From nature, of course. It must borne in mind that in the apetites of the body there is very little difference between man and other living creatures. Finally, we defile by our imagination what of its own nature is fair and holy. If we were willing to evaluate things not according to the opinion of the crowd, but according to nature itself, how is it less repulsive to eat, chew, digest, evacuate, and sleep after the fashion of dumb animals, than to enjoy lawful and permitted carnal relations? In Praise of Marriage (1519), in Erasmus on Women (1996) Erika Rummel <!-- De Conscribendis Epistolas -->

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„In the country of the blind the one-eyed man is king.“

— Desiderius Erasmus
Adagia (first published 1500, with numerous expanded editions through 1536), III, IV, 96 Also in the same passage of the Adagia is a variant: Inter caecos regnat strabus (Among the blind, the squinter rules).

„I have turned my entire attention to Greek. The first thing I shall do, as soon as the money arrives, is to buy some Greek authors; after that, I shall buy clothes.“

— Desiderius Erasmus
Letter to Jacob Batt (12 April 1500); Collected Works of Erasmus Vol 1 (1974) <!-- page 252. Toronto, University of Toronto Press --> Variant translation: When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes.

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„There is nothing I congratulate myself on more heartily than on never having joined a sect.“

— Desiderius Erasmus
As quoted in Thomas More and Erasmus (1965) by Ernest Edwin Reynolds, p. 248

„Do not be guilty of possessing a library of learned books while lacking learning yourself.“

— Desiderius Erasmus
Letter to Christian Northoff (1497), as translated in Collected Works of Erasmus (1974), p. 115

„No Man is wise at all Times, or is without his blind Side.“

— Desiderius Erasmus
The Alchymyst, in [http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14031/14031.txt Colloquies of Erasmus, Volume I.]

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