Carl Sandburg citations

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Carl Sandburg

Date de naissance: 6. janvier 1878
Date de décès: 22. juillet 1967
Autres noms:Carl August Sandburg

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Carl Sandburg, né le 6 janvier 1878 à Galesburg, Illinois, de parents suédois, et mort le 22 juillet 1967, à son domicile, à Flat Rock, Caroline du Nord, est un poète, historien, écrivain américain d'origine suédoise connu notamment pour ses ouvrages Chicago Poems , Cornhuskers et Smoke and Steel .

À sa mort, en 1967, le président Lyndon B. Johnson déclare :

« Carl Sandburg était plus que la voix de l'Amérique, plus que le poète de sa force et de son génie. Il était l'Amérique. »

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Citations Carl Sandburg

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„Time is the coin of your life. You spend it. Do not allow others to spend it for you.“

— Carl Sandburg
Declaration at his 85th birthday party (6 January 1963), as quoted in The Best of Ralph McGill : Selected Columns (1980) by Ralph McGill, edited by Michael Strickland, Harry Davis, and Jeff Strickland, p. 82 Time is the coin of your life. It is the only coin you have, and only you can determine how it will be spent. Be careful lest you let other people spend it for you. As quoted without source in The School Musician Director and Teacher Vol. 43 (1971) by the American School Band Directors' Association

„A baby is God's opinion that life should go on.“

— Carl Sandburg
Context: A baby is God's opinion that life should go on. A book that does nothing to you is dead. A baby, whether it does anything to you, represents life. If a bad fire should break out in this house and I had my choice of saving the library or the babies, I would save what is alive. Never will a time come when the most marvelous recent invention is as marvelous as a newborn baby. The finest of our precision watches, the most super-colossal of our supercargo plants, don't compare with a newborn baby in the number and ingenuity of coils and springs, in the flow and change of chemical solutions, in timing devices and interrelated parts that are irreplaceable. A baby is very modern. Yet it is also the oldest of the ancients. A baby doesn't know he is a hoary and venerable antique — but he is. Before man learned how to make an alphabet, how to make a wheel, how to make a fire, he knew how to make a baby — with the great help of woman, and his God and Maker. Remembrance Rock (1948), Ch. 2, p. 7

„Look out how you use proud words.“

— Carl Sandburg
Context: Look out how you use proud words. When you let proud words go, it is not easy to call them back. They wear long boots, hard boots. "Primer Lessons" (1922)

„Love, with little hands,
Comes and touches you
With a thousand memories,
And asks you
Beautiful, unanswerable questions.“

— Carl Sandburg
Context: Under the summer roses When the flagrant crimson Lurks in the dusk Of the wild red leaves, Love, with little hands, Comes and touches you With a thousand memories, And asks you Beautiful, unanswerable questions. "Under the Harvest Moon" (1916)

„There are men who can't be bought.“

— Carl Sandburg
Context: Man is a long time coming. Man will yet win. Brother may yet line up with brother: This old anvil laughs at many broken hammers. There are men who can't be bought. "The People Will Live On" (1936)

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„If a bad fire should break out in this house and I had my choice of saving the library or the babies, I would save what is alive. Never will a time come when the most marvelous recent invention is as marvelous as a newborn baby.“

— Carl Sandburg
Context: A baby is God's opinion that life should go on. A book that does nothing to you is dead. A baby, whether it does anything to you, represents life. If a bad fire should break out in this house and I had my choice of saving the library or the babies, I would save what is alive. Never will a time come when the most marvelous recent invention is as marvelous as a newborn baby. The finest of our precision watches, the most super-colossal of our supercargo plants, don't compare with a newborn baby in the number and ingenuity of coils and springs, in the flow and change of chemical solutions, in timing devices and interrelated parts that are irreplaceable. A baby is very modern. Yet it is also the oldest of the ancients. A baby doesn't know he is a hoary and venerable antique — but he is. Before man learned how to make an alphabet, how to make a wheel, how to make a fire, he knew how to make a baby — with the great help of woman, and his God and Maker. Remembrance Rock (1948), Ch. 2, p. 7

„I believe in everything — I am only looking for proofs.“

— Carl Sandburg
Context: Back of every mistaken venture and defeat is the laughter of wisdom, if you listen. Every blunder behind us is giving a cheer for us, and only for those who were willing to fail are the dangers and splendors of life. To be a good loser is to learn how to win. I was sure there are ten men in me and I do not know or understand one of them. I could safely declare, I am an idealist. A Parisian cynic says "I believe in nothing. I am looking for clues." My statement would be : I believe in everything — I am only looking for proofs. Incidentals (1904); this is sometimes paraphrased: "I am an idealist. I believe in everything — I am only looking for proofs."

„Back of every mistaken venture and defeat is the laughter of wisdom, if you listen.“

— Carl Sandburg
Context: Back of every mistaken venture and defeat is the laughter of wisdom, if you listen. Every blunder behind us is giving a cheer for us, and only for those who were willing to fail are the dangers and splendors of life. To be a good loser is to learn how to win. I was sure there are ten men in me and I do not know or understand one of them. I could safely declare, I am an idealist. A Parisian cynic says "I believe in nothing. I am looking for clues." My statement would be : I believe in everything — I am only looking for proofs. Incidentals (1904); this is sometimes paraphrased: "I am an idealist. I believe in everything — I am only looking for proofs."

„Two years, ten years, and passengers ask the conductor:
What place is this?
Where are we now?“

— Carl Sandburg
Context: p>Pile the bodies high at Austerlitz and Waterloo. Shovel them under and let me work — I am the grass; I cover all. And pile them high at Gettysburg And pile them high at Ypres and Verdun. Two years, ten years, and passengers ask the conductor: What place is this? Where are we now?</p "Grass" (1918)

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„Man is a long time coming.
Man will yet win.“

— Carl Sandburg
Context: Man is a long time coming. Man will yet win. Brother may yet line up with brother: This old anvil laughs at many broken hammers. There are men who can't be bought. "The People Will Live On" (1936)

„The people will live on.
The learning and blundering people will live on.“

— Carl Sandburg
Context: The people will live on. The learning and blundering people will live on. They will be tricked and sold and again sold. And go back to the nourishing earth for rootholds. "The People, Yes" (1936)

„Yesterday is done. Tomorrow never comes. Today is here. If you don't know what to do, sit still and listen.“

— Carl Sandburg
Context: Yesterday is done. Tomorrow never comes. Today is here. If you don't know what to do, sit still and listen. You may hear something. Nobody knows. We may pull apart the petals of a rose or make chemical analysis of its perfume, but the mystic beauty of its form and odor is still a secret, locked in to where we have no keys. Incidentals (1904)

„The United States is, not are. The Civil War was fought over a verb.“

— Carl Sandburg
Context: The United States is, not are. The Civil War was fought over a verb. Orval Faubus don't know that. But he gonna know, he gonna know. Comments at the centennial celebration of the Lincoln-Douglas debates; Knox College, Galesburg, Illinois, Oct. 7, 1958. Quoted in Herbert Mitgang, "Again—Lincoln v. Douglas", The New York Times Magazine, Oct. 19, 1958, pp. 26-27.

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