Alfred Tennyson citations

Alfred Tennyson foto
0  0

Alfred Tennyson

Date de naissance: 6. août 1809
Date de décès: 6. octobre 1892
Autres noms:Alfred Lord Tennyson,Lord Alfred Tennyson

Publicité

Alfred Tennyson, 1er baron Tennyson , frère de Charles Tennyson Turner, est l'un des poètes britanniques les plus célèbres de l'époque victorienne.

Nombre de ses vers sont fondés sur des thèmes classiques ou mythologiques, comme In Memoriam, écrit en l'honneur de son meilleur ami Arthur Hallam, un jeune poète et un camarade à Trinity College fiancé à la sœur de Tennyson, et qui mourut tragiquement d'une hémorragie cérébrale à l'âge de 22 ans. L'un des plus célèbres ouvrages de Tennyson est Les Idylles du Roi , une série de poèmes narratifs fondés entièrement sur le roi Arthur et la légende arthurienne et influencés, dans ses thèmes, par les premiers récits de Sir Thomas Malory sur ce roi légendaire. L'œuvre fut dédiée au prince Albert, l'époux de la reine Victoria. Durant sa carrière, Lord Tennyson fit des tentatives d'écriture dramatique, mais ses pièces n'eurent pas de succès.

Auteurs similaires

George Granville foto
George Granville
baron Lansdown de Biddeford, poète et auteur dramatique
Robert Lytton foto
Robert Lytton
personnalité politique britannique
Thomas Babington Macaulay foto
Thomas Babington Macaulay
politicien et historien britannique
Edward Bulwer-Lytton foto
Edward Bulwer-Lytton
homme politique, poète, dramaturge et romancier britannique
Martin Rees foto
Martin Rees
scientifique britannique
David Puttnam foto
David Puttnam
producteur britannique
Hartley Shawcross
politicien britannique
Nigel Lawson foto
Nigel Lawson
personnalité politique britannique

Citations Alfred Tennyson

„Of love that never found his earthly close,
What sequel?“

— Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: Of love that never found his earthly close, What sequel? Streaming eyes and breaking hearts? Or all the same as if he had not been? Not so. Shall Error in the round of time Still father Truth? O shall the braggart shout For some blind glimpse of freedom work itself Thro' madness, hated by the wise, to law System and empire? Sin itself be found The cloudy porch oft opening on the Sun? And only he, this wonder, dead, become Mere highway dust? or year by year alone Sit brooding in the ruins of a life, Nightmare of youth, the spectre of himself! If this were thus, if this, indeed, were all, Better the narrow brain, the stony heart, The staring eye glazed o'er with sapless days, The long mechanic pacings to and fro, The set gray life, and apathetic end. But am I not the nobler thro' thy love? O three times less unworthy! likewise thou Art more thro' Love, and greater than thy years. " Love and Duty http://www.readbookonline.net/read/4310/14259/", l. 1- 21 (1842)

„The great brand
Made lightnings in the splendour of the moon“

— Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: The great brand Made lightnings in the splendour of the moon, And flashing round and round, and whirl'd in an arch, Shot like a streamer of the northern morn, Seen where the moving isles of winter shock By night, with noises of the northern sea. So flash'd and fell the brand Excalibur. Lines 136-142

Publicité

„The many fail: the one succeeds.“

— Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: The bodies and the bones of those That strove in other days to pass, Are wither'd in the thorny close, Or scatter'd blanching on the grass. He gazes on the silent dead: "They perish'd in their daring deeds." This proverb flashes thro' his head, "The many fail: the one succeeds." The Arrival, st. 2

„Man comes and tills the field and lies beneath,
And after many a summer dies the swan.“

— Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: The woods decay, the woods decay and fall, The vapours weep their burthen to the ground, Man comes and tills the field and lies beneath, And after many a summer dies the swan. Me only cruel immortality Consumes: I wither slowly in thine arms, Here at the quiet limit of the world, A white-hair'd shadow roaming like a dream The ever-silent spaces of the East, Far-folded mists, and gleaming halls of morn. " Tithonus http://home.att.net/%7ETennysonPoetry/tith.htm", st. 1 (1860)

„Little flower — but if I could understand
What you are, root and all, and all in all,
I should know what God and man is.“

— Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: Flower in the crannied wall, I pluck you out of the crannies, I hold you here, root and all, in my hand, Little flower — but if I could understand What you are, root and all, and all in all, I should know what God and man is. "Flower in the Crannied Wall" (1869)

„We dare not even by silence sanction lies.“

— Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: We love not this French God, the child of hell, Wild War, who breaks the converse of the wise; But though we love kind Peace so well, We dare not even by silence sanction lies. It might be safe our censures to withdraw, And yet, my Lords, not well; there is a higher law. " The Third of February, 1852 http://home.att.net/%7ETennysonPoetry/tfe.htm", st. 2 (1852)

„Make broad thy shoulders to receive my weight“

— Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: My end draws nigh; 't is time that I were gone. Make broad thy shoulders to receive my weight Lines 163-164

„All the charm of all the Muses often flowering in a lonely word.“

— Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: Thou that singest wheat and woodland, tilth and vineyard, hive and horse and herd; All the charm of all the Muses often flowering in a lonely word. " To Virgil http://home.att.net/%7ETennysonPoetry/virg.htm", st. 3 (1882)

Publicité

„Thus truth was multiplied on truth“

— Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: p>Thus truth was multiplied on truth, the world Like one great garden show'd, And thro' the wreaths of floating dark up-curl'd, Rare sunrise flow'dAnd Freedom rear'd in that august sunrise Her beautiful bold brow, When rites and forms before his burning eyes Melted like snow.</p

„But am I not the nobler thro' thy love?
O three times less unworthy! likewise thou
Art more thro' Love, and greater than thy years.“

— Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: Of love that never found his earthly close, What sequel? Streaming eyes and breaking hearts? Or all the same as if he had not been? Not so. Shall Error in the round of time Still father Truth? O shall the braggart shout For some blind glimpse of freedom work itself Thro' madness, hated by the wise, to law System and empire? Sin itself be found The cloudy porch oft opening on the Sun? And only he, this wonder, dead, become Mere highway dust? or year by year alone Sit brooding in the ruins of a life, Nightmare of youth, the spectre of himself! If this were thus, if this, indeed, were all, Better the narrow brain, the stony heart, The staring eye glazed o'er with sapless days, The long mechanic pacings to and fro, The set gray life, and apathetic end. But am I not the nobler thro' thy love? O three times less unworthy! likewise thou Art more thro' Love, and greater than thy years. " Love and Duty http://www.readbookonline.net/read/4310/14259/", l. 1- 21 (1842)

„I am Merlin
Who follow The Gleam.“

— Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: O young Mariner, You from the haven Under the sea-cliff, You that are watching The gray Magician With eyes of wonder, I am Merlin, And I am dying, I am Merlin Who follow The Gleam. " Merlin and the Gleam http://whitewolf.newcastle.edu.au/words/authors/T/TennysonAlfred/verse/demeter/merlingleam.html", st. 1 (1889)

„And in her raiment's hem was traced in flame
WISDOM, a name to shake
All evil dreams of power — a sacred name.“

— Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: There was no blood upon her maiden robes Sunn'd by those orient skies; But round about the circles of the globes Of her keen And in her raiment's hem was traced in flame WISDOM, a name to shake All evil dreams of power — a sacred name. And when she spake, Her words did gather thunder as they ran, And as the lightning to the thunder Which follows it, riving the spirit of man, Making earth wonder, So was their meaning to her words. No sword Of wrath her right arm whirl'd, But one poor poet's scroll, and with his word She shook the world.

Publicité

„Theirs not to make reply,
Theirs not to reason why,
Theirs but to do and die:
Into the valley of death
Rode the six hundred.“

— Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: "Forward, the Light Brigade!" Was there a man dismay'd? Not tho' the soldier knew Some one had blunder'd: Theirs not to make reply, Theirs not to reason why, Theirs but to do and die: Into the valley of death Rode the six hundred. St. 2

„To follow knowledge like a sinking star,
Beyond the utmost bound of human thought.“

— Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: How dull it is to pause, to make an end, To rust unburnish'd, not to shine in use! As tho' to breath were life. Life piled on life Were all too little, and of one to me Little remains: but every hour is saved From that eternal silence, something more, A bringer of new things; and vile it were For some three suns to store and hoard myself, And this gray spirit yearning in desire To follow knowledge like a sinking star, Beyond the utmost bound of human thought. l. 22-32

„A spring rich and strange,
Shall make the winds blow
Round and round,
Thro’ and thro’,
Here and there,
Till the air
And the ground
Shall be fill’d with life anew.“

— Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: Nothing will die; All things will change Thro’ eternity. ‘Tis the world’s winter; Autumn and summer Are gone long ago; Earth is dry to the centre, But spring, a new comer, A spring rich and strange, Shall make the winds blow Round and round, Thro’ and thro’, Here and there, Till the air And the ground Shall be fill’d with life anew.

„Death is the end of life; ah, why
Should life all labour be?“

— Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Context: Death is the end of life; ah, why Should life all labour be? Let us alone. Time driveth onward fast, And in a little while our lips are dumb. Let us alone. What is it that will last? All things are taken from us, and become Portions and parcels of the dreadful past. Let us alone. What pleasure can we have To war with evil? Is there any peace In ever climbing up the climbing wave? All things have rest, and ripen toward the grave In silence; ripen, fall and cease: Give us long rest or death, dark death, or dreamful ease. Choric Song, st. 4

Prochain
Anniversaires aujourd'hui
William L. Shirer foto
William L. Shirer
journaliste américain 1904 - 1993
Bernard Cornwell foto
Bernard Cornwell
écrivain britannique 1944
Jean Lartéguy
écrivain et journaliste français 1920 - 2011
Frederick Busch
écrivain américain 1941 - 2006
Un autre 59 ans aujourd'hui
Auteurs similaires
George Granville foto
George Granville
baron Lansdown de Biddeford, poète et auteur dramatique
Robert Lytton foto
Robert Lytton
personnalité politique britannique
Thomas Babington Macaulay foto
Thomas Babington Macaulay
politicien et historien britannique
Edward Bulwer-Lytton foto
Edward Bulwer-Lytton
homme politique, poète, dramaturge et romancier britannique
Martin Rees foto
Martin Rees
scientifique britannique