„If you place your head in a lion's mouth, then you cannot complain one day if he happens to bite it off.“

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Agatha Christie2
romancière britannique 1890 - 1976
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„Kong bites his head off in a PG13 kinda way“

—  Peter Jackson New Zealand film director, producer, actor, and screenwriter 1961
A note in the 1996 script for 'King Kong quoted in USA Today http://www.angelfire.com/ri/KingKong33/mar05.html

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„The tabloids are like animals, with their own behavioural patterns. There’s no point in complaining about them, any more than complaining that lions might eat you.“

—  David Mellor former British politician, non-practising barrister, broadcaster, journalist and businessman 1949
Quoted in The Independent (1992-11-03) following his resignation in September of that year.

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„If you throw away your weapons, some less scrupulous person will pick them up. If you turn the other cheek, you will get a harder blow on it than you got on the first one. This does not always happen, but it is to be expected, and you ought not to complain if it does happen.“

—  George Orwell English author and journalist 1903 - 1950
Context: Shakespeare starts by assuming that to make yourself powerless is to invite an attack. This does not mean that everyone will turn against you (Kent and the Fool stand by Lear from first to last), but in all probability someone will. If you throw away your weapons, some less scrupulous person will pick them up. If you turn the other cheek, you will get a harder blow on it than you got on the first one. This does not always happen, but it is to be expected, and you ought not to complain if it does happen. The second blow is, so to speak, part of the act of turning the other cheek. First of all, therefore, there is the vulgar, common-sense moral drawn by the Fool: "Don't relinquish power, don't give away your lands." But there is also another moral. Shakespeare never utters it in so many words, and it does not very much matter whether he was fully aware of it. It is contained in the story, which, after all, he made up, or altered to suit his purposes. It is: "Give away your lands if you want to, but don't expect to gain happiness by doing so. Probably you won't gain happiness. If you live for others, you must live for others, and not as a roundabout way of getting an advantage for yourself." "Lear, Tolstoy and the Fool," Polemic (March 1947)

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