„Water and air, the two essential fluids on which all life depends, have become global garbage cans.“

Jacques-Yves Cousteau photo
Jacques-Yves Cousteau3
officier de la Marine nationale et explorateur océanographi… 1910 - 1997
Publicité

Citations similaires

Peter Greenaway photo
Morarji Desai photo

„Life at any time can become difficult: life at any time can become easy. It all depends upon how one adjusts oneself to life.“

—  Morarji Desai Former Indian Finance Minister, Freedom Fighters, Former prime minister 1896 - 1995
As quoted in Change your Body - Is your Body Acidic or Alkaline? http://books.google.co.in/books?id=n4iZAgAAQBAJ&pg=PT44 (2014) by Monica Wright, and Matt Thom, p. 44 <!-- Fitness Kick Pty Ltd -->

Publicité
Robert Grosseteste photo
John Ruskin photo

„The living inhabitation of the world — the grazing and nesting in it, — the spiritual power of the air, the rocks, the waters, to be in the midst of it, and rejoice and wonder at it, and help it if I could, — happier if it needed no help of mine, — this was the essential love of Nature in me, this the root of all that I have usefully become, and the light of all that I have rightly learned.“

—  John Ruskin English writer and art critic 1819 - 1900
Context: My entire delight was in observing without being myself noticed,— if I could have been invisible, all the better. I was absolutely interested in men and their ways, as I was interested in marmots and chamois, in tomtits and trout. If only they would stay still and let me look at them, and not get into their holes and up their heights! The living inhabitation of the world — the grazing and nesting in it, — the spiritual power of the air, the rocks, the waters, to be in the midst of it, and rejoice and wonder at it, and help it if I could, — happier if it needed no help of mine, — this was the essential love of Nature in me, this the root of all that I have usefully become, and the light of all that I have rightly learned. Praeterita, volume I, chapter IX (1885-1889).

James Madison photo
Augusten Burroughs photo
Wally Lamb photo
Publicité
Sei Shonagon photo
 Paracelsus photo
Thomas Watson photo
José Ortega Y Gasset photo

„Life today is the fruit of an interregnum, of an empty space between two organizations of historical rule — that which was, that which is to be. For this reason it is essentially provisional.“

—  José Ortega Y Gasset Spanish liberal philosopher and essayist 1883 - 1955
Context: No one knows toward what center human things are going to gravitate in the near future, and hence the life of the world has become scandalously provisional. Everything that today is done in public and in private — even in one's inner conscience — is provisional, the only exception being certain portions of certain sciences. He will be a wise man who puts no trust in all that is proclaimed, upheld, essayed, and lauded at the present day. All that will disappear as quickly as it came. All of it, from the mania for physical sports (the mania, not the sports themselves) to political violence; from "new art" to sun-baths at idiotic fashionable watering-places. Nothing of all that has any roots; it is all pure invention, in the bad sense of the word, which makes it equivalent to fickle caprice. It is not a creation based on the solid substratum of life; it is not a genuine impulse or need. In a word, from the point of view of life it is false. We are in presence of the contradiction of a style of living which cultivates sincerity and is at the same time a fraud. There is truth only in an existence which feels its acts as irrevocably necessary. There exists today no politician who feels the inevitableness of his policy, and the more extreme his attitudes, the more frivolous, the less inspired by destiny they are. The only life with its roots fixed in earth, the only autochthonous life, is that which is made of inevitable acts. All the rest, all that it is in our power to take or to leave or to exchange for something else, is mere falsification of life. Life today is the fruit of an interregnum, of an empty space between two organizations of historical rule — that which was, that which is to be. For this reason it is essentially provisional. Men do not know what institutions to serve in truth; women do not know what type of men they in truth prefer. The European cannot live unless embarked upon some great unifying enterprise. When this is lacking, he becomes degraded, grows slack, his soul is paralyzed. We have a commencement of this before our eyes today. The groups which up to today have been known as nations arrived about a century ago at their highest point of expansion. Nothing more can be done with them except lead them to a higher evolution. They are now mere past accumulating all around Europe, weighing it down, imprisoning it. With more vital freedom than ever, we feel that we cannot breathe the air within our nations, because it is confined air. What was before a nation open to all the winds of heaven, has turned into something provincial, an enclosing space. Chapter XIV: Who Rules The World?

Publicité
Charles Stross photo
Barry Goldwater photo

„To my mind the single essential element on which all discoveries will be dependent is human freedom.“

—  Barry Goldwater American politician 1909 - 1998
Context: My faith in the future rests squarely on the belief that man, if he doesn't first destroy himself, will find new answers in the universe, new technologies, new disciplines, which will contribute to a vastly different and better world in the twenty-first century. Recalling what has happened in my short lifetime in the fields of communication and transportation and the life sciences, I marvel at the pessimists who tell us that we have reached the end of our productive capacity, who project a future of primarily dividing up what we now have and making do with less. To my mind the single essential element on which all discoveries will be dependent is human freedom. With No Apologies (1979)

George Fitzhugh photo
Luther Burbank photo