„Be extremely subtle, even to the point of formlessness. Be extremely mysterious, even to the point of soundlessness.“

—  Sun Tzu, Context: Be extremely subtle, even to the point of formlessness. Be extremely mysterious, even to the point of soundlessness. Thereby you can be the director of the opponent's fate. Alternative translation: Subtle and insubstantial, the expert leaves no trace; divinely mysterious, he is inaudible. Thus he is master of his enemy's fate. Alternative translation: O divine art of subtlety and secrecy! Through you we learn to be invisible, through you inaudible and hence we can hold the enemy's fate in our hands.
Original

微乎微乎,至于无形;神乎神乎,至于无声;故能为敌之司命。

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philosophe théoricien de l'art de la guerre chinois -543 - 251 avant J.-C.
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