„The true objective of war is peace.“

—  Sun Tzu, This attributed to Sun Tzu and his book The Art of War. Actually James Clavell’s foreword in The Art of War http://www.scribd.com/doc/42222505/The-Art-Of-War states http://www.collegetermpapers.com/TermPapers/History_Other/Sun_Tzu_vs_The_Wisdom_of_the_Desert.shtml, “’the true object of war is peace.’” Therefore the quote is stated by James Clavell, but the true origin of Clavell's quotation is unclear. Nonetheless the essence of the quote, that a long war exhausts a state and therefore ultimately seeking peace is in the interest of the warring state, is true, as Sun Tzu in Chapter II Waging Wars says that "There is no instance of a country having benefited from prolonged warfare. It is only one who is thoroughly acquainted with the evils of war that can thoroughly understand the profitable way of carrying it on." This has been interpreted by Lionel Giles http://www.dutchjoens.info/SunTzu%20-%20Art%20of%20War.pdf as "Only one who knows the disastrous effects of a long war can realize the supreme importance of rapidity in bringing it to a close." Dr. Hiroshi Hatanaka, President of Kobe College, Nishinomiya, Hyōgo, Japan is recorded as saying "the real objective of war is peace" in Pacific Stars and Stripes Ryukyu Edition, Tokyo, Japan (10 February 1949), Page 2, Column 2.
Sun Tzu photo
Sun Tzu3
philosophe théoricien de l'art de la guerre chinois -543 - 251 avant J.-C.
Publicité

Citations similaires

Jane Addams photo
William Beveridge photo
Publicité
Tim O'Brien photo
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry photo
Ralph Bunche photo
J.C. Ryle photo
Sri Chinmoy photo

„War forgets peace. Peace forgives war. War is the death of the life human. Peace is the birth of the Life Divine.“

—  Sri Chinmoy Indian writer and guru 1931 - 2007
Context: War forgets peace. Peace forgives war. War is the death of the life human. Peace is the birth of the Life Divine. Our vital passions want war. Our psychic emotions desire peace.

Sun Tzu photo

„In peace, prepare for war. In war, prepare for peace.“

—  Sun Tzu ancient Chinese military general, strategist and philosopher from the Zhou Dynasty -543 - 251 avant J.-C.
Sometimes erroneously prepended to the opening line "The art of war is of vital importance to the State", but appears to be a variation of the Roman motto "Si vis pacem, para bellum". It's not clear who first misattributed this phrase to Sun Tzu. The earliest appearance of the phrase in Google Books is 1920, when it appeared in a pharmaceutical journal, but no attribution was given then.

Publicité
Gabrielle Roy photo
Taylor Caldwell photo
Ursula K. Le Guin photo
Publicité
Jonathan Maberry photo
Semyon Timoshenko photo
Jawaharlal Nehru photo

„Wars are fought to gain a certain objective.“

—  Jawaharlal Nehru Indian lawyer, statesman, and writer, first Prime Minister of India 1889 - 1964
Context: Wars are fought to gain a certain objective. War itself is not the objective; victory is not the objective; you fight to remove the obstruction that comes in the way of your objective. If you let victory become the end in itself then you've gone astray and forgotten what you were originally fighting about. Interview by James Cameron, in Picture Post (28 October 1950)

Simone de Beauvoir photo

„After wars peace, after peace, another war. Every day men are born and others die.“

—  Simone de Beauvoir French writer, intellectual, existentialist philosopher, political activist, feminist, and social theorist 1908 - 1986