„A warrior is always engaged in a life-and-death struggle for Peace.“

—  Morihei Ueshiba, Context: When life is victorious, there is birth; when it is thwarted, there is death. A warrior is always engaged in a life-and-death struggle for Peace.
Morihei Ueshiba photo
Morihei Ueshiba1
fondateur de l'Aïkido 1883 - 1969
Publicité

Citations similaires

Peter Wessel Zapffe photo
Publicité
Knut Hamsun photo
Leo Tolstoy photo
Henryk Sienkiewicz photo
Isaac Asimov photo

„Life is pleasant. Death is peaceful. It's the transition that's troublesome.“

—  Isaac Asimov American writer and professor of biochemistry at Boston University, known for his works of science fiction and popular … 1920 - 1992

Sri Chinmoy photo

„War forgets peace. Peace forgives war. War is the death of the life human. Peace is the birth of the Life Divine.“

—  Sri Chinmoy Indian writer and guru 1931 - 2007
Context: War forgets peace. Peace forgives war. War is the death of the life human. Peace is the birth of the Life Divine. Our vital passions want war. Our psychic emotions desire peace.

Haruki Murakami photo
Publicité
 Muhammad photo
Patrick Buchanan photo
Upton Sinclair photo

„Jesus, as we know, answered and said "Get thee behind me, Satan!" And he really meant it; he would have nothing to do with worldly glory, with "temporal power;" he chose the career of a revolutionary agitator, and died the death of a disturber of the peace.“

—  Upton Sinclair American novelist, writer, journalist, political activist 1878 - 1968
Context: In the most deeply significant of the legends concerning Jesus, we are told how the devil took him up into a high mountain and showed him all the kingdoms of the world in a moment of time; and the devil said unto him: "All this power will I give unto thee, and the glory of them, for that is delivered unto me, and to whomsoever I will, I give it. If thou, therefore, wilt worship me, all shall be thine." Jesus, as we know, answered and said "Get thee behind me, Satan!" And he really meant it; he would have nothing to do with worldly glory, with "temporal power;" he chose the career of a revolutionary agitator, and died the death of a disturber of the peace. And for two or three centuries his church followed in his footsteps, cherishing his proletarian gospel. The early Christians had "all things in common, except women;" they lived as social outcasts, hiding in deserted catacombs, and being thrown to lions and boiled in oil. But the devil is a subtle worm; he does not give up at one defeat, for he knows human nature, and the strength of the forces which battle for him. He failed to get Jesus, but he came again, to get Jesus' church. He came when, through the power of the new revolutionary idea, the Church had won a position of tremendous power in the decaying Roman Empire; and the subtle worm assumed the guise of no less a person than the Emperor himself, suggesting that he should become a convert to the new faith, so that the Church and he might work together for the greater glory of God. The bishops and fathers of the Church, ambitious for their organization, fell for this scheme, and Satan went off laughing to himself. He had got everything he had asked from Jesus three hundred years before; he had got the world's greatest religion. Book Seven : The Church of the Social Revolution, "Christ and Caesar"

Mercedes Lackey photo
Publicité
 Ambrose photo

„Accordingly, death is a harbor of peace for the just, but is believed a shipwreck for the wicked.“

—  Ambrose bishop of Milan; one of the four original doctors of the Church 339 - 397
De bono mortis, 8, 31.

Bret Harte photo

„There is peace in the swamp, though the quiet is Death“

—  Bret Harte American author and poet 1836 - 1902
East and West Poems, Part I, The Copperhead.

Simón Bolívar photo

„Colombians! My last wish is for the happiness of the patria. If my death contributes to the end of partisanship and the consolidation of the union, I shall be lowered in peace into my grave.“

—  Simón Bolívar Venezuelan military and political leader, South American libertador 1783 - 1830
Final proclamation to the people of Colombia (8 December 1830), as quoted in Man of Glory : Simón Bolívar (1939) by Thomas Rourke Variant translations: If my death contributes to the end of the parties and the consolidation of the Union, I shall go quietly to my grave. Colombians! my last wishes are for the welfare of the fatherland. If my death contributes to the cessation of party strife, and to the consolidation of the Union, I shall descend in peace to the grave. For my enemies I have only forgiveness. If my death shall contribute to the cessation of factions and the consolidation of the Union, I can go tranquilly to my grave.

 Muhammad photo
Prochain