„The idle mind knows not what it wants.“
Otioso in otio animus nescit quid velit.

—  Ennius, As quoted by Aulus Gellius in Noctes Atticae (Attic Nights), Book XIX, Chapter X
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Ennius
poète latin -239 - -169 avant J.-C.
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„When the idle poor
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—  Yip Harburg American song lyricist 1896 - 1981
"When the Idle Poor Become the Idle Rich" in Finian's Rainbow (1946) - Fred Astaire version http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dmW0FA93cJc

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„People know what they want because they know what other people want.“

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„When a scene is being shot, it is very difficult to know what one wants it to say, and even if one does know, there is always a difference between what one has in mind and the result on film.“

—  Michelangelo Antonioni Italian film director and screenwriter 1912 - 2007
Context: When a scene is being shot, it is very difficult to know what one wants it to say, and even if one does know, there is always a difference between what one has in mind and the result on film. I never think ahead of the shot I'm going to make the following day because if I did, I'd only produce a bad imitation of the original image in my mind. So what you see on the screen doesn't represent my exact meaning, but only my possibilities of expression, with all the limitations implied in that phrase. Perhaps the scene reveals my incapacity to do better; perhaps I felt subconsciously ironic toward it. But it is on film; the rest is up to you.

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„There is this first benefit from myths, that we have to search and do not have our minds idle.“

—  Sallustius Roman philosopher and writer
Context: There is this first benefit from myths, that we have to search and do not have our minds idle. That the myths are divine can be seen from those who have used them. Myths have been used by inspired poets, by the best of philosophers, by those who established the mysteries, and by the Gods themselves in oracles. But why the myths are divine it is the duty of philosophy to inquire. Since all existing things rejoice in that which is like them and reject that which is unlike, the stories about the Gods ought to be like the Gods, so that they may both be worthy of the divine essence and make the Gods well disposed to those who speak of them: which could only be done by means of myths. III. Concerning myths; that they are divine, and why.

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