„The ape, vilest of beasts, how like to us!“

—  Ennius, As quoted by Cicero in De Natura Deorum, Book I, Chapter XXXV Variant translation: How like us is that ugly brute, the ape!
Original

Simia quam similis turpissima bestia nobis!

 Ennius photo
Ennius
poète latin -239 - -169 avant J.-C.
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„Here enter not vile bigots, hypocrites,
Externally devoted apes, base snites,
Puffed-up, wry-necked beasts, worse than the Huns“

—  Francois Rabelais major French Renaissance writer 1494 - 1553
Context: Here enter not vile bigots, hypocrites, Externally devoted apes, base snites, Puffed-up, wry-necked beasts, worse than the Huns, Or Ostrogoths, forerunners of baboons: Cursed snakes, dissembled varlets, seeming sancts, Slipshod caffards, beggars pretending wants, Fat chuffcats, smell-feast knockers, doltish gulls, Out-strouting cluster-fists, contentious bulls, Fomenters of divisions and debates, Elsewhere, not here, make sale of your deceits. Chapter 54 : The inscription set upon the great gate of Theleme

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„The vilest deeds like poison weeds
Bloom well in prison-air:
It is only what is good in Man
That wastes and withers there“

—  Oscar Wilde Irish writer and poet 1854 - 1900
Context: The vilest deeds like poison weeds Bloom well in prison-air: It is only what is good in Man That wastes and withers there: Pale Anguish keeps the heavy gate, And the Warder is Despair. Pt. V, st. 30

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„A book is a mirror: if an ape looks into it an apostle is hardly likely to look out.“

—  Georg Christoph Lichtenberg German scientist, satirist 1742 - 1799
Context: A book is a mirror: if an ape looks into it an apostle is hardly likely to look out. We have no words for speaking of wisdom to the stupid. He who understands the wise is wise already. E 49 Variant translations of first portion: A book is a mirror: If an ape peers into it, you can't expect an apostle to look out. A book is a mirror: If an ass peers into it, you can't expect an apostle to look out. — this has actually been the most commonly cited form, but it is based on either a loose non-literal translation or a mistranslation of the German original: Ein Buch ist Spiegel, aus dem kein Apostel herausgucken kann, wenn ein Affe hineinguckt.

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„Clearly, we have both of these sides in us, and that's why I sometimes call us "the bipolar apes."“

—  Frans de Waal Dutch primatologist and ethologist 1948
Context: It is true that the chimpanzee is dominance-oriented, violent, territorial. But it's also cooperative in many ways, and so that side is sometimes forgotten. The bonobo is sensual, sensitive, sexual, a peacemaker, but also can have a nasty side, and that's sometimes forgotten. So both species are sort of the ends of the spectrum, and we fall somewhere in between. Clearly, we have both of these sides in us, and that's why I sometimes call us "the bipolar apes."

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„And while the lamp holds out to burn,
The vilest sinner may return.“

—  Isaac Watts English hymnwriter, theologian and logician 1674 - 1748
Hymn 88, Hymns and Spiritual Songs, Book I.

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