„A man's weaknesses may intrude on his faith but they do not diminish it.“

Robert Ludlum1
écrivain américain 1927 - 2001
Publicité

Citations similaires

Andrei Tarkovsky photo

„The Stalker seems to be weak, but essentially it is he who is invincible because of his faith and his will to serve others.“

—  Andrei Tarkovsky Soviet and Russian film-maker, writer, film editor, film theorist, theatre and opera director 1932 - 1986
p. 181

Pope Benedict XVI photo

„I think the essential point is a weakness of faith.“

—  Pope Benedict XVI 265th Pope of the Catholic Church 1927
from an interview with EWTN news director Raymond Arroyo in August 2003 as reported by Zenit.org, Aug. 24, 2003

Publicité
William James photo

„The weak are not a noble breed. Their sublime deeds of faith, daring, and self-sacrifice usually spring from questionable motives. The weak hate not wickedness but weakness; and one instance of their hatred of weakness is hatred of self.“

—  Eric Hoffer American philosopher 1902 - 1983
Context: The weak are not a noble breed. Their sublime deeds of faith, daring, and self-sacrifice usually spring from questionable motives. The weak hate not wickedness but weakness; and one instance of their hatred of weakness is hatred of self. All the passionate pursuits of the weak are in some degree a striving to escape, blur, or disguise an unwanted self. It is a striving shot through with malice, envy, self-deception, and a host of petty impulses; yet it often culminates in superb achievements. Thus we find that people who fail in everyday affairs often show a tendency to reach out for the impossible. They become responsive to grandiose schemes, and will display unequaled steadfastness, formidable energies and a special fitness in the performance of tasks which would stump superior people. It seems paradoxical that defeat in dealing with the possible should embolden people to attempt the impossible, but a familiarity with the mentality of the weak reveals that what seems a path of daring is actually an easy way out: It is to escape the responsibility for failure that the weak so eagerly throw themselves into grandiose undertakings. For when we fail in attaining the possible the blame is solely ours, but when we fail in attaining the impossible we are justified in attributing it to the magnitude of the task. Ch. 15: "The Unnaturalness Of Human Nature"

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe photo
Claude McKay photo
Giacomo Casanova photo

„Man is free, but his freedom ceases when he has no faith in it[. ]“

—  Giacomo Casanova Italian adventurer and author from the Republic of Venice 1725 - 1798
Memoirs (trans. Machen 1894), book 1, Preface http://etext.library.adelaide.edu.au/c/casanova/c33m/preface2.html

Publicité
Philip José Farmer photo

„Know a man’s faith, and you knew at least half the man. Know his wife, and you knew the other half.“

—  Philip José Farmer American science fiction writer 1918 - 2009
Context: Burton, though an infidel, made it his business to investigate thoroughly every religion. Know a man’s faith, and you knew at least half the man. Know his wife, and you knew the other half. Chapter 23 (p. 176)

Norbert Wiener photo
Ernesto Che Guevara photo
Dan Simmons photo
Publicité
Bhagat Singh photo

„His reasoning can be mistaken, wrong, misled and sometimes fallacious. But he is liable to correction because reason is the guiding star of his life. But mere faith and blind faith is dangerous: it dulls the brain, and makes a man reactionary.“

—  Bhagat Singh Indian revolutionary 1907 - 1931
Context: Any man who stands for progress has to criticize, disbelieve and challenge every item of the old faith. Item by item he has to reason out every nook and corner of the prevailing faith. If after considerable reasoning one is led to believe in any theory or philosophy, his faith is welcomed. His reasoning can be mistaken, wrong, misled and sometimes fallacious. But he is liable to correction because reason is the guiding star of his life. But mere faith and blind faith is dangerous: it dulls the brain, and makes a man reactionary. Why I am an atheist? (1930)

Algernon Charles Swinburne photo

„Fear that makes faith may break faith; and a fool Is but in folly stable.“

—  Algernon Charles Swinburne English poet, playwright, novelist, and critic 1837 - 1909
Queen Mary Stuart as portrayed in Bothwell. Act I. Sc. 3.

Frederick William Robertson photo
William James photo

„Who knows whether the faithfulness of individuals here below to their own poor over-beliefs may not actually help God in turn to be more effectively faithful to his own greater tasks?“

—  William James American philosopher, psychologist, and pragmatist 1842 - 1910
Context: This thoroughly 'pragmatic' view of religion has usually been taken as a matter of course by common men. They have interpolated divine miracles into the field of nature, they have built a heaven out beyond the grave. It is only transcendentalist metaphysicians who think that, without adding any concrete details to Nature, or subtracting any, but by simply calling it the expression of absolute spirit, you make it more divine just as it stands. I believe the pragmatic way of taking religion to be the deeper way. It gives it body as well as soul, it makes it claim, as everything real must claim, some characteristic realm of fact as its very own. What the more characteristically divine facts are, apart from the actual inflow of energy in the faith-state and the prayer-state, I know not. But the over-belief on which I am ready to make my personal venture is that they exist. The whole drift of my education goes to persuade me that the world of our present consciousness is only one out of many worlds of consciousness that exist, and that those other worlds must contain experiences which have a meaning for our life also; and that although in the main their experiences and those of this world keep discrete, yet the two become continuous at certain points, and higher energies filter in. By being faithful in my poor measure to this over-belief, I seem to myself to keep more sane and true. I can, of course, put myself into the sectarian scientist's attitude, and imagine vividly that the world of sensations and scientific laws and objects may be all. But whenever I do this, I hear that inward monitor of which W. K. Clifford once wrote, whispering the word 'bosh!' Humbug is humbug, even though it bear the scientific name, and the total expression of human experience, as I view it objectively, invincibly urges me beyond the narrow 'scientific' bounds. Assuredly, the real world is of a different temperament — more intricately built than physical science allows. So my objective and my subjective conscience both hold me to the over-belief which I express. Who knows whether the faithfulness of individuals here below to their own poor over-beliefs may not actually help God in turn to be more effectively faithful to his own greater tasks? Lecture XX, "Conclusions"

Prochain